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Honoring those who fought and died in Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation New Dawn
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Army Maj. Robert D. Lindenau

Died October 20, 2008 Serving During Operation Enduring Freedom


39, of Camano Island, Wash.; assigned to the 91st Civil Affairs Battalion, 95th Civil Affairs Brigade (Airborne), Fort Bragg, N.C.; died Oct. 20 in Charbagh, Afghanistan, of wounds sustained when a rocket-propelled grenade struck his vehicle.

Memorial service scheduled for soldier

The Associated Press

FORT BRAGG, N.C. — A memorial service is scheduled to honor a Fort Bragg soldier killed by a rocket propelled grenade attack last week in Afghanistan.

The service will be held Tuesday at the Faith Chapel at Fort Bragg for Maj. Robert D. Lindenau, who died Oct. 20 when the grenade hit his vehicle in Charbagh, Afghanistan.

Lindenau was a member of the 91st Civil Affairs Battalion, 95th Civil Affairs Brigade.

The 39-year-old officer is survived by his wife, Tonya, and four children, all of Fort Bragg.

Lindenau is a native of Seattle and holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in music from the University of Idaho. He joined the Army in 1996 as a mechanic and was commissioned an officer in 1999.


Army Capt. Robert D. Lindenau remembered

The Associated Press

Robert D. Lindenau studied classical guitar while he was at the University of Idaho, and was involved in a rock band that played at venues in Idaho.

“After college when he told me he was going to join the Army, I told him that he did not seem to be the ‘Army type,’” said his uncle, Mike Bloom. “In ways he wasn’t, and in other ways, he was perfect for the Army, bringing his refined ways and behavior to the ranks as an example.”

Lindenau, 39, of Camano Island, Wash., died Oct. 20 in Charbagh when a rocket-propelled grenade struck his vehicle. He was assigned to Fort Bragg, N.C.

“People looked up to him,” said Bloom. “Little kids were drawn to him.”

He held bachelor’s and master’s degrees in music. He joined the Army in 1996 as a mechanic and was commissioned as an officer in 1999.

Bloom recalls the day his father died over 10 years ago. “He brought his guitar into his hospital room and played soothing music for him, which I could tell helped my dad have a more peaceful passing,” he said.

He is survived by his wife, Tonya, and their four children, Rachael, 12, Gabe, 10, Sarah, 8, and Hannah, 6.

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